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5 pc 1 1/4 inch mini crankbait (set C)

5 pc 1 1/4 inch mini crankbait (set C)
Set C 5 pc 1 1/4 inch crankbaits 1.8 grams in 5 lifelike colors to surely attract any predator

PRICE: $8.49


California Freshwater Lakes 1 
Fish Facts 1 
Fish Identification Charts 1 
Fish Recipes 2 
Fish Stories 0 
Fish weight calculator 0 
Fishing Jokes 2 
Fishing tips and tricks 8 
Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips 6 
General fishing articles 0 
Knots to use 2 
Moon Phases 0 
New Test Category 0 
Rigging techniques 1 
Trolling techniques 2 
Weather in Cabo San Lucas 0 
[other] 4 

Fish Facts Vote which one you feel is true.
Goldfish can't close their eyes without eyelids. ? 
1 Puffer Fish has enough poison to kill 30 people ? 
A koi fish named 'Hanako' lived for 225 years. ? 
Fish can drown in water. ? 
Fish can see 70 times further in air than in water ? 
Fish in polluted lakes lose their sense of smell. ? 
Many fish can change sex during their lifespan. ? 
The goliath tigerfish can eat small crocodiles. ? 
There is a Jellyfish that could be immortal. ? 
There's a shark in Greenland that eats polar bears ? 
Where do you fish most?
Freshwater ? 
Saltwater ? 

Around 10% of the world's total fish species can be found just within the Great Barrier Reef.
When Anglerfish mate, they melt into each other and share their bodies forever.
Not all fishes lay eggs.
Fishes like split fins, surf-perches, and some sharks instead carry and give birth to live young. Scientists have also discovered that the embryos of some of these fishes actually consume each other in the womb. How’s that for creepy fish facts?
The Sea Anemone looks like a flower, but it’s actually a carnivorous animal that eats small fish and shrimp.
Fishes hear with both their ears and their skeletons, sensing the vibrations of sound in the water.
Scientists even suspect that sharks can clearly hear sounds from over 3 km away.
In three decades, the world's oceans will contain more discarded plastic than fish when measured by weight, researchers say.
As of 2020, there were 34,000 known fish species around world. That’s more than the number of species in all other vertebrates: birds, reptiles, mammals, and amphibians combined.
Just how man species of fish are there?
As of 2020, there were 34,000 known fish species around world. That’s more than the number of species in all other vertebrates: birds, reptiles, mammals, and amphibians combined.
Even Catfish are finicky
Taste Buds ? Catfish have a more refined sense of flavor than humans. Our 10,000 taste buds may seem like a lot, but catfish can have as many as 175,000. This helps them find the exact location of their next meal.
Fish have built in radar?
Built-in Radar Many species of fish have a powerful sense organ called the lateral line running across their body. It can detect motion in the water, allowing them to hunt prey, avoid predators, and navigate in the dark.

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 Jun 5, 2009; 09:59AM - the wiggley wiggle
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  ed moses
Tip&Trick Description 1: needed 7'' worm with tail any color
Tip&Trick Description 2: cast lure let it sink all the way to the bottom retrieve with stop and go process with quick short jerks in between reeling make sure to pause often
Tip&Trick Description 3: the fish will inhale the bait on the pause this method is guaranteed to catch bass also works well on other fresh water fish good luck out there
 Nov 22, 2005; 02:53PM - The Bubbles
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  joe webb
Tip&Trick Description 1: when the water is cold and the bass are slow. tie on a tube and break off some peices of alkaselesrs and put them into the bait. and cast and hang on.
 Mar 23, 2004; 01:15PM - In depth spinnerbaiting
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  Steven Narup
In depth spinnerbaiting Tip&Trick Description 1: The equipment that Steven Narup
prefers to use is a Pflueger Trion.
In depth spinnerbaiting Tip&Trick Description 2: Gambler Pro Series Spinnerbait

In-depth Spinnerbaiting

By: Steven Narup



When most people are asked, “what is a spinnerbait?” They will more then likely reply with this, “it has a hook with a wire attached to it, with a lead head and a silicone skirt, with either one or two blades.” The majority of the time they will automatically describe the clothes pin spinnerbait. Well in essence, there is much more to that. There is more then just that style of spinnerbait, this is what most people do not understand. Two other spinnerbait types are just as productive when presented in the right situation. These two baits are the tail-spinner and the in-line spinner. These baits are slowly catching on to the clothespin spinnerbait.



There are quite a few styles of spinnerbaits, including tail spinners, in-line spinners, and clothespin style spinnerbaits. Each style has there own time and place. The most widely used of these spinnerbait choices, is the clothes pin style.



Tail spinners can be a great choice when fishing for smallmouth bass and or finicky largemouth due to the bait’s compact size.



In-line Spinners became obsolete for many years by most bass anglers. Until now, they are slowly catching on to both Smallmouth and Largemouth anglers.



In-line spinners are a great bait when the fish are active but they can also be great when presented it other situations. Most people use in-line spinners when the fish are in a negative feeding mood, due to the bait’s smaller more compact size. There is one problem with in-line spinners, which keep the majority of people away from them, the fact that they will give you line twist. To help with this scenario try a high quality stainless steel ball bearing, this will cut back on the line twist. A ball bearing helps prevent line twist like so, when the bait starts to spin and twist in the water column the line will most likely twist without a ball bearing. However, if you have a ball bearing connecting the leader to the main line, when the bait twists the ball bearing spins the line back so that the line will not twist. If by any chance you do have line twist, let out a couple hundred feet of line into the water and turn your trolling motor on, this will get most of the twist out of your line. Another trick is the tie your line to a heavy object and stretch the line out by tightening your drag and pulling the line.





The clothespin style spinnerbait comes in many different combinations including blade size and style and different size heads. There are Steel and Titanium wires. The Titanium version is nearly indestructible, and needs little or no tuning at all. Titanium also lets off quite a bit more vibration then steel. The heads on clothespin spinnerbaits are starting to be produced with different materials as well, such as Lead, and Tungsten. Spinnerbait anglers are slowly starting to make the switch to Tungsten spinnerbaits, due to the fact the head is almost ¾ the size of lead, making the bait work through cover almost effortlessly.





. In general, spinnerbaits are a very versatile lure, which is one main reason why most bass anglers use them. Bass anglers have been using them for many years now and they still produce fish as if they came out yesterday, you just have to know the different ways to fish the bait.



Tail spinners can be great finesse baits and they can be fished shallow or deep, because the body of the bait is lead, with a little blade on the back. The majority of tail spinners come with a single treble hook, making them not as easy as the clothespin style spinnerbait when trying to fish through thick cover. To work the tail-spinner you can just reel the bait back to the boat, but doing this you will reduce the odds of catching more fish, but it does work. Instead, you should give the bait a little action. You can yo-yo the bait by letting the bait fall to the bottom, then pick your rod tip up to about a 10 o’clock position, just keep repeating this procedure unless you are not producing. On the other hand, you can do a combination of things, to give the fish something different to look at. You can yo-yo the bait during part of the cast, then reel, or twitch it back to the boat. One last way to fish this bait would be to vertical jig it, in deep, clear, cold water. This technique will work in different conditions, but works best in deep, clear, cold water. When you vertical jig a tail spinner you cast the bait out a few feet and let the bait fall vertically, on a semi-slack line then you slowly lift your rod tip and shake the bait, let the bait fall and keep repeating this process. I like to use baitcasting gear when fishing tail spinners, but there are times when you need to fish lighter baits and that is when spinning gear comes into play. I mainly fish Pflueger rods and reels. The rods are very nice they come with premium Fuji guides and a Fuji reel seat, making the rod one nice package. I really like the Trion Baitcasting reel because they come with five ball bearings, one roller bearing and a smooth multi-disc main gear applied star drag system, making this a great reel for mostly any type of fishing. The reel is great if you want to fish a lighter line, because you can set your drag and the drag is so smooth that when a fish pools there will not be as much stress on the line itself.





In-line spinners have been around for over fifty years, and they are still going strong, Mepps has been in the in-line spinner business for a while now, and they still sell great. Most anglers do not use in-line spinners while fishing for bass instead they are using bigger in-line spinners fishing for pike or musky. However, I know they are missing a lure that can catch bass like it can pike and musky. I have had great success fishing in-line spinners in creek openings, where the creek empties into the main river, fishing for smallmouth bass. In-line spinners can be worked shallow or deep, they come with or without tails, painted blades or non-painted blades. When you work an in-line spinner, the best possible way to fish these is to reel them in. If you try to jerk the bait, you will lose a lot of action, because in-line spinners are not made for jerking. In-line spinners let off a lot of flash, and maximum flash happens when you just reel it in. When I fish in-line spinners I like to use spinning gear preferably the Pflueger Trion spinning rod in a 6 ½ foot medium action, with a Pflueger Trion spinning reel, because they come in a 6:3:1 gear ratio which will allow you to speed up the bait without getting as tired out. They are very smooth and cast light baits a mile.



Clothespin spinnerbaits are one of your more versatile bait in the spinnerbait family. You can work them quite a few different ways, and give the bait a great action if you desire. When I work a safety pin spinnerbait, I really like to use a Pflueger Trion Baitcasting rod, anywhere from 6-foot medium to a 7-foot medium heavy action. The 6-foot rod will help you when you want to make accurate casts, and the 7-foot rod will help when you want to get distance with your bait. With the Trion rods, they are extra sensitive high modulus graphite, which will give you the ability to feel the blades turn on your bait. I will throw the bait on 15-20 pound test Berkley Trilene XL. When you work a safety pin spinnerbait, you can just reel it in, but again you are going to be missing some fish. When I fish a safety pin style spinnerbait, I sometimes jerk the bait, doing this gives the bait sort of an injured baitfish presentation. You can also let the bait flutter down, then you pick up your rod tip, and repeat, doing this gives the bait a yo-yo type effect. If I am going to be fishing a spinnerbait in cold water, I will look for anything that lets off heat because this will warm up the water just a little bit, fish do feel the difference, and I will fish the bait around that. If the fish are just coming up and nipping at the bait, you may want to add a trailer hook for extra insurance. I will usually throw a spinnerbait with a trailer hook in any tournament situation. If the fish are coming up and hitting that bait and not taking it you can use a soft plastic trailer, I like to use the Gambler Pro Series Spinnerbaits, beacause they come with high quailty blades and ball bearings, making it almost effortless to slow roll them and let them flutter down. To dress the Gambler Pro Series spinnerbait up I prefer the three-inch Bear Claw Grub from Bearpaws Custom Handpoured Baits. I like the Bearpaws grub because it comes with the scent baked right in to the bait, this will give you a definite edge on other anglers, because you will not need to use scent on the exterior of the bait.



Spinnerbaits are a great and versatile lure that have made a lot of many for companies in the fishing industry. The only thing I can say is next time you go out on the water I dare you to tie on a spinnerbait, and I know that you will not regret it.
 Jan 4, 2004; 08:18PM - Power Drop -Shot Tactic
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  Steve S&K Guide Service
Tip&Trick Description 1: We have been using a Power Drop Shot technique that you may have heard of, and it works great in Heavy Cover, and around docks and wood in rivers and lakes. We just rig a heavy weight of 3/8 to 3/4 of an ounce, and then tie on the bait, such as a Yamamoto 'IKA' tube about 10 inches up the line on a 3/0 Gamakatsu hook, and flip and pitch it right in the same way as a jig or other bait. It stays there longer and has more action. Deadly on in-active fish. To view more tips and tactics and chat with other bass anglers from all over North America, stop by and visit us at our Proboards! http://skguides.proboards20.com
 Aug 12, 2003; 10:50AM - Jiggin' It
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  Steven Narup
Tip&Trick Description 1: Jigs come in all sorts of shapes, colors, sizes, and even skirt materials. There are a bunch of different ways to fish them as well. However, to be able to catch them when the fishing is tough, you have to be very versatile. In this article, I will go through different ways of fishing jigs and I will begin to get you acquainted with this wonderful lure called a jig, in this little guide called “Jiggin’ It”.



Let me first give you a little bit of “background” about jigs. Jigs come made with many different kinds of materials. Just to name a few hair, tinsel and silicone. However, in this guide we will mostly be talking about silicone jigs. Silicone jigs are much easier too fish. Being that when they get wet, they become waterproof making them easier to slide through thick vegetation. To help aid the jig going through the thick milfoil some people use scent.



Jigs come in many different shapes and size, they even come with different shaped heads for different types of applications. They come made with a flipping, swimming, and even a stand-up type head. They also come in an array of different weight heads.



Jigs even come in countless colors and even different shades. It is best that when you first start out fishing a jig you should stick to basic colors. Some of the basic jig colors would include brown and orange, moss green and even black and blue.



When selecting a jig by its size you want to use as less weight as possible. Using less weight will give the jig a more realistic action and presentation. You also need less weight because bass will normally hit the jig when it is on the fall, and using less weight will help the jig fall slower. While we are talking about fall rate lets talk a little about jig trailers. Plastic trailers work great for cooler water, when the fish are more active. Jigs with pork are a deadly combination when the water temperature drops below 60. When you pick a trailer, you should keep in mind to match the trailer color to the color of the jigs skirt.



Now lets get into how to fish a jig. There are many different ways to fish them. One of the more popular ways to fish them is to do a hop and swim type retrieve. When you do this, you should make a long cast and then let the jig rest on the bottom for a few seconds, and then slowly lift your rod tip and let the jig fall back to the bottom. Then after a few hops you swim the jig a few feet, then begin to hop the jig again. This hop and swim method has produced greatly for many people all throughout the country.



Another way to fish a jig is to just hop the jig on the bottom or even drag it. However, one of the deadliest ways to fish a jig is to swim it close to the bottom or above a weed line. A seven-foot heavy action rod will give the jig enough action to entice big bass, be sure to pick a rod with a soft tip and enough backbone to horse the big boys out of the thick stuff.



The last technique I am going to cover is flipping and pitching. To do this you should flip the jig into weed pockets or into shoreline cover. When you do this, a good choice is a seven and a half foot heavy action rod and thirty-five pound monofilament. The heavy action rod will be stout enough to pull a five pound bass out the roughest spots you can flip your jig into.



This is just a little guide on how to fish a jig. If you experiment with different ways to fish them and you find out which technique the bass wants, you will have a killer day out on the water!




 Aug 5, 2003; 11:53AM - Muddy Water Baits
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  Steve vonBrandt/S&K Guide Service
Tip&Trick Description 1: Muddy Water Baits
By Steve VonBrandt
Nothing ruins the occasional fishing trip more than driving a long distance to your favorite spot, only to find out it’s been raining for the last few weeks and the water is the color of Chocolate milk! Many years ago, I was like most weekend anglers, and would immediately try to find another lake or river that might be a little more clear, or just turn around and go home. But I found over the last 20 years, that it isn’t necessary to give up so quickly on muddy water.

There are many times when a creek arm, or a certain portion of the lake or river isn’t as muddy, or there is a transition zone where it goes from muddy to stained, which can be a good area, but, even if there is no clearer water, there are many things you can do. Most gamefish react the same way to muddy water, they go shallow and they move closer to structure. This could mean a lot of different types of structure, such as brushpiles, laydowns, rocks, stump fields, pads on shallow flats, anything! When the bas are holding tight to cover, because of low visibility, the lure presentations sometimes need to be precise, such as when flipping a log or tree roots with a jig. Bellow are the 6 basic choices you should have rigged for fishing muddy waters.

Plastic Worms: I know this sounds like a strange choice, but a lot of times when bass are holding real tight to cover, a larger, bulkier worm, with some rattle inserted, possibly with a paddle tail, worked real close in the cover, can work well. I used a black or a black/red combination in muddy water. I also use the new Big 7 inch Senko that is out now, and drop it right into heavier cover. I have been using the new Cut-Tail worm for this also.

Vibrating Rattlers: These baits such as the Bill Lewis Rat-L-Trap, Cotton Bordell, Diamond Shad, or the Rattlin’ Rapalas, are excellent choices for probing different depths of muddy water, and where muddy changes to stained. The noise and vibrations of these baits, along with a realistic shad shape, make these great baits and stained to muddy water.

Crankbaits: I use a lot of the real fat bodied crankbaits in muddy water. I choose different baits with a wide wobble, and sometimes rattles. I usually stay with darker colors with red in muddy water. These colors with a wide wobble, are easier for bass to find.

Spinnerbaits: The bass will be using their lateral line more in the muddy water, so a spinnerbait with a heavy pulse such as a Terminator night bait, with a black skirt, and Colorado blade, is a perfect choice. You could even add rattles to this bait, which I have had success with in the muddy rivers and lakes in the Northeast. I always use a single Colorado blade on the spinner baits in muddy water, but in stained, or warmer stained water, I do go to an Oklahoma Blade sometimes with good results.

Topwaters: These are my favorite baits to use in muddy water. There are so many baits that shallow, muddy water bass will hit! The buzzbait worked slowly around cover will draw tremendous strikes. The walking type baits, such as a Zara Spook, and Fenwick walking baits, Jitterbugs, Crazy Crawlers, and a variety of other topwaters, including poppers with rattles, are excellent and exciting choices for muddy water bass. The bass will all be in water that is 1-4 feet deep, eliminating a lot of the water, making them easier to catch!

Jigs: Jigs in Brown/Black or Blue/Black with a Zoom or uncle Josh trailer, with some rattles, are an excellent choice to flip into laydowns, and shallow stump fields, and of course on docks. Make repeated casts to give them a good look and provoke them.

If you stick with these baits and methods the next time you run into muddy water, you will never be afraid to see it again. It will become a friend, as it has become to me.

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